Taylor
Jun 27

Soft loaf of bread

27 comments

Edited: Jul 16

Yes I know this is basically just like bread rolls but I had been reluctant to try a loaf as it says somewhere here that a loaf of bread is not easy to cook through because of the liquid levels. However, I was craving a bacon sarnie, not a roll so I made a small loaf in a 15cm x 9cm x 9cm tin, cooked for 25 minutes and it came out great. Just finished that bacon sarnie so thought I would let you folks know. Next to try are american pancakes.

 

250g ultra fine fibre flour

1 tbs butter

185 ml warm water

1 tsp inulin or honey

8g yeast

pinch of salt

 

1. Place water inulin or honey and yeast in a bowl. Allow to proof for about 10 minutes in a warm place. I put it in the oven which has been pre heated to 1/4 gas mark then turn it off.

 

2. When really frothy add to flour, salt and butter and knead for 5 - 10 minutes

 

3. Drop into loaf tin and proof for 45 mins to an hour. Bake 210 degrees C or gas mark 6 for 20 to 25 minutes. For the last 5 minutes remove the loaf from the tin and bake.

 

 

jolunahdy
Jun 27

Looks lovely. Is the Inulin essential?

Taylor
Jun 27

It gives the yeast something to work on. I am not an expert but I have read if you use honey the interaction with the yeast practically negates the carbs in the honey. Maybe just put yeast and water with the four as the recipe on website says but not sure if bread will be as light. Hope this helps

jolunahdy
Jun 27

Thank You. It was the Carbs I was worried about, so sounds good news. I've never sucessfully made bread so not expecting miracles anyway, lol.

Taylor
Jun 27

Good luck. I have made most of the low carb breads out there but all just ok but this one is so easy and yummy as well

Gillian Shannon
Jul 15

I would agree. I use inulin and it certainly works. I need to be careful with inulin as it triggers my IBS but I’ve made this bread a few times now and it’s absolutely delightful. I follow a keto diet so it’s a delight to be able to eat bread especially this good.

Sam Soblessed
Jul 16

Can this recipe be made by hand without a mixer ?

Taylor
Jul 16

Absolutely, I am just lazy. Just knead the dough until it is silky and elastic, not sure how long as only use the mixer but certainly not a problem to makde by hand.

Sam Soblessed
Jul 16

Thank you 😘

Gerry Davies
Jul 16

What about your proofing time before it goes in the oven?

Love the way you guys are talking amongst yourselves, exciting for us to see!

Taylor
Jul 16

Oops yes just seen that I han’t mentioned that. Have added into recipe method.

Gillian Shannon
Jul 16

I use slightly warm water to start with which kick starts the yeast and the inulin off really well.

Gerry Davies
Jul 17

Hi Vicky, I have a question about using inulin to activate yeast. I guess you can tell the degree of activation by how quickly and frothy your yeast mixture appears. Have you noticed any difference between activating it with sugar or inulin. I have not heard of activating yeast with inulin before and a rep from Sensus (a manufacturer of inulin) mentioned that inulin suppresses yeast activity, I wonder if this is true? I tested inulin and yeast together and there was some activity but not overly active. What has been your experience?

Taylor
Jul 17

When I use it with warm water it goes mega frothy. I put the full amount of water for the recipe with the yeast and inulin and put in the oven heated to 1/4. I got the inulin yeast thing from the sugar free Londoner site. Don’t know the science only that it worked so carried on doing it

kath.hinton
Aug 7

Wow - this looks fantastic - I bought some inulin so am going to give it a try. (Would a teaspoon of sugar work too rather than honey? Would that be enough? I'm guessing a teaspoon of sugar wouldn't be too harmful. I really don't like honey)

I'd not heard of adding the yeast to just the water (and inulin) before? So just wait till it froths and then put the other stuff in and put in the mixer with the dough hook for 10 mins? (just as an aside for other - like me - inexperienced bakers; make sure the water is warm and not hot. My first go at rolls, I killed the yeast with hot water)

 

 

 

Gerry Davies
Aug 7

A teaspoon of sugar will activate the yeast best of all. You can do your own experiment, use two cups of warm water 1 tsp yeast in each cup and 1 tsp of sugar in one and inulin in the other, see which one is more active. Honey contains anti-microbials so might not work as well as sugar.

Gerry Davies
Aug 7

I recently made bread using 50/50 fiberflour and ultra-fine, very good rise, better than UF on its own.

O'Kane
Sep 12

HELP! For me FiberFlour is the best thing since .... I'm afraid I can't say sliced bread because making any kind of bread or roll for me is consistently an epic fail! I've followed all recipes (this and for soft rolls) to the letter but its always sticky in the middle. Even the flatbreads! I'm otherwise pretty handy in the kitchen so I'm incredibly frustrated at not being able to do this. The dough proofs beautifully and gets a good rise in the oven, but is always sticky - even when I shove it back in for a while. I'm using an Aga and have tried both ovens - Baking (180 degrees) and Roasting (220 degrees). I've even tried a breadmaker which was a disaster. Thanks in advance.

Taylor
Sep 12

Oh what a shame. Maybe less liquid or try with the 50/50 Gerry mentioned above. Good luck

Gerry Davies
Sep 12

 

This is a roll made with 100 g of dough form a batch using UF 200g & FF 300g to make 500g total flour, added 375 g water (yeast 15g salt 8g) Mixed and kneaded with stand mixer for 5-8 mins. Baked 220 C fan for 10 mins then turned down heat to 140 for another 10 mins. Try making rolls with 100 to 120 g dough, flatten the dough ball, let it rise and bake on the proofing tray like the professional bakers do. I admit the bread is always wetter than regular but no idea why it should be sticky. Best of luck keep us informed.

O'Kane
Sep 15

Here's an update on my bread/roll making odyssey. After several attempts at rolls I finally had a successful batch; which went down a storm. Hurrah!

 

For the benefit of anyone else having difficulties, I thought I'd let you know how I managed it (NB: haven't achieved a good loaf yet though).

 

I followed QueenKeto's blog post - https://queenketo.com/fiberflour-low-carb-olive-bread-buns/ - (without the olives) but with 2 tsp inulin added to the warm water and yeast. For me, the important point she makes was the need to proof twice (an hour each time) and to ensure that the initial kneading results in an elastic dough to ensure the dough rises properly and the rolls are cooked in the middle. I cooked the rolls the baking oven of my Aga (which is roughly 180 degrees) for 35 minutes and then left them to cool completely for a couple of hours.

 

FYI - the inulin definitely results in a frothier reaction with the yeast than sugar does.

 

It's also worth noting to others trying to make bread/rolls that, as Gerry says, the finished product is wetter than regular bread in the middle.

Gillian Shannon
Sep 15

Thankfully I’ve never had to proof them twice, but I’ve been very lucky so far I guess. 2tsp of Inulin works every time. I manage to get 8 - 110 gram rolls out of the mixture which I freeze for when they’re needed.

kath.hinton
Sep 16

I love Queen Keto. I had the same issue when I made rolls. I thought I hadn't cooked them enough - but the moisture may have been the issue? I haven't had time recently but I'm going to give both a loaf (have to buy the small 1lb tin first) and the rolls again.

 

Bread is theabsolute biggest thing for me. Thanks everyone for ideas and feedback.

Gerry Davies
Sep 16

The beauty of using Fiberflour for bread is in its simplicity, just add water, yeast and salt. Proof for an hour and bake for 20 minutes. If you use a stand mixer it should not take more than 10 minutes of your day, not counting proof and bake time. I make bread dough every day and use the same recipe for rolls, flatbreads, pizza, tortilla chips, bread sticks, etc. So simplicity is key, IMO anyway. Best of luck with your breads.

Cheers, Gerry

Maggie Topkis
Sep 17

No soggy middle? FWIW, soggy middles are the bane of all gluten-free breads as well

O'Kane
Sep 17

Not soggy. As Gerry previously mentioned its slightly wetter than regular bread. Negligible though.

Gerry Davies
Sep 17

Hi Lianne If this breadmaker solution is repeatable it's a breakthrough. The setting #12 might be important as well. So glad you worked it out. Keep us informed please.

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